A blog post in lieu of other blog posts

Friends and me at Hendry Wines a couple of weeks ago. One of many things I meant to blog about….

OK, so I have this friend, and she has a great blog.

Why is it great? Well, she writes well, has a good sense of humor, talks about interesting things and isn’t afraid to have an opinion. But, I honestly think that is only 50% of why it is a great blog. The other 50% is because she posts very regularly.  She wrote four times in July, actually a small amount for her, but still once a week. When you go to her blog, you know you are likely to see a post, and be entertained.

Now, me on the other hand? I think I have an ok blog. I am still trying to find a good balance from being enthusiastic over stuff, and talking too much, and also writing about whatever is interesting in the moment, and not just when something is amazing. But my number one problem is I do not do it enough, and I do not blog on a consistent schedule. I’m a little bit better at keeping my tumblr going, but that is mostly because of reblogs.

I’m trying to change that, but it seems unlikely.
So this post is a round up of things I have meant to blog about, basically since January.
Some may end up being posts of their own eventually, but most will not. As it is kind of a ramble, I will put it behind a tag.

2012 Things I Meant to Blog About:

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Independence Day at the McKittrick Hotel

(slightly mirrored from my Tumblr)

As I’ve mentioned before on this blog (and more than a million times in daily life), Sleep No More is on of my most favorite shows from New York. And it something I miss very much, especially because they started having special holiday-themed shows the month after I moved to California. So I missed all the Halloween, New Years and Valentine’s Day fun.

But guess who will be at the McKittrick on Independence Day?

THIS GIRL!

I’m so happy. I literally spent ten minutes dancing around the office. And I convinced two of my most favorite people to go with me. (Thanks Joe and Justin! You thought all you would have to do is house me for my trip, but no, we will also wear crazy masks and party like its 1932!)

Obviously, I’m very excited about this show. I’m looking forward to the trip in general. I desperately need a break from work, miss all the lovely people in NYC, and can’t wait to see a whole slew of shows. The list at the moment is: 4000 Miles, Newsies, Peter & the Starcatcher, Once, One Man Two G’vners, and of course Sleep No More (both a regular performance and the special independence Day show). I’m also contemplating adding either the SoHo Rep Production of Uncle Vanya or one of the Druid Murphy shows that is part of the Lincoln Center Festival.

Are there any must-sees missing from the list?

14 days and I’ll be there!!

Art in Transit – Literary Journeys

So, as per usual, I have a million half-written blog posts. But today, like a month ago, what is actually getting me to blog is transit-related-art.

Last week, I noticed an interesting ad in the Montgomery BART station, or what I thought was an ad – this illustration had wolves running through a snow-filled BART train. Upon looking closely, I noticed that the person in the foreground was reading Jack London’s Call of the Wild. And indeed, the poster was not really an ad, but an artistic interpretation of reading on a train, and imagination taking hold.

I meant to research what these were or who had done them, but forgot until I saw a second one this morning:

Pretty neat!!

Not only does this capture one of the joys of a daily transit ride, but the books are all from Bay Area authors. So, when I got to my desk today, I did a little poking, and learned a little bit more about the posters.

The full article is available on the BART blog here.  The posters are created by artist Owen Smith, and are the third in a BART public art project.

Smith took the broad mission of the poster art program – providing riders with the opportunity to enjoy original artwork while traveling through the BART system – and pitched an idea inspired by literary icons with Bay Area connections.  The series “Literary Journeys” depicts BART riders immersed in books by Dashiell Hammett, Jack London and Amy Tan, with scenes from the books coming to life in their imaginations. “I love the idea that there could be something interesting and different to look at while you are waiting for a train,” Smith says.

 

Smith’s art posters – like the previous two series – contain no explicit messaging, which is an important concept of the series.  “If it’s a little mysterious, that’s OK,” he says.

Gina DeLorenzo, a member of BART’s communications team who manages the poster program, said train stations provide “a unique gallery setting” for Smith’s art. The posters, 60 in all, are placed in unused advertising spaces throughout the BART system. “We want the artist to really think about the rider experience, and then bring to it their own interests and interpretation,” she said.

I recommend keeping your eyes peeled for the posters as you go about your daily commute. I haven’t seen the last in person yet, so I will be searching for it over the next few weeks. I think this is a great project – a simple way to bring some joy to the daily commute.

They Wore Their Best

I take transit every day – usually MUNI in the morning and BART in the evening.  And I love it. I love it more, having moved from New York, because I have the option of driving when I want to – especially to go grocery shopping or on other errands involving schlepping. But mostly, I love it.

I love having time to myself for 20-30 minutes twice a day. Usually that time is used to prepare for the day at work, to read (I just finished Ira Levin’s A Kiss Before Dying which was phenomenal) or listening to audiobooks/podcasts (recently started At Home by Bill Bryson, which is great). And when I do the latter, I play a lot of Scramble with Friends and Draw Something.

But sometimes, I start random conversations that lead to new found obsessions (as I detailed in my post about Maximum Fun and Bullseye here) or end up doing my makeup (I only do this if I have two seats to myself).

But, although I love transit, rarely do I get to learn something new or see something moving or beautiful. And especially, I very rarely think about the world beyond my own day-to-day life.

San Bruno BART has changed that with “They Wore Their Best”  – twelve then-and-now photograph comparisons about the Japanese interment in California during World War II.

The photos from the 40s were taken by famed photographer Dorthea Lange and the modern photos were taken by Paul Kitagaki, Jr., who discovered that his own family’s interment had been documented by Lange. San Bruno’s Tanforan – then a race track – was converted into a detention center where many gathered before being sent to the interment camps.  All the images are moving and strong and, I think, an important reminder of the past.

120,000 individuals  of Japanese descent- two-thirds US Citizens – were sent to interment camps under presidential Executive Order 9066 two months after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor. Upon discovering Lange’s photos, Kitagaki “wanted to find out the rest of the story: how the internment had changed the lives of people who’d lost their homes, businesses and sometimes their families.”

I’m afraid I don’t do either photographers’ work much justice with my camera phone, but I recommend taking a little transit trip to San Bruno to see this exhibit. You can use the time on the train for yourself, and the time in the station to connect to this important and sad part of our American and Californian history.
“The issei (first generation) are all gone and the nisei (second generation) are in their 80s and 90s,” said exhibition organizer Richard Oba, of the Tanforan Assembly Center Memorial Committee. “I felt like this was the last hurrah. These pictures were frozen in time. But now Paul has unlocked them.”

SFGate article (where the above quotes are from) about the exhibit:
Photos illustrate effects of WWII internment camps by Patricia Yollin (May 12, 2012)